New bow!

Remember this bow: go here

The latest flightbow I did some month ago. I called it “The Queen”.  Flightbows are always a great possibility for to test the limits of designs and woods, flightbows are somehow a kind of Formula 1, an exercise area for bowyers.

The queen- braced. The arrow is made of thin baked strips of fine grown larch, with the tip and the nock enforced with bird#s eye maple.

“The Queen” is such an overwhelming exercise for me, so I decided to give it a try as a longer version, thought to be drawn to 28″. It measures up my expectations at all points: great design and performance.

It ended up in one of the best bows, I´ve ever done, maybe the best bow I was ever able to do.

Originally the bow was thought to be made as a one piece, but cause some of cracks arising in the handle- area, I had to change the plan. I remembered a design inspired by Marc St. Louis:go here

So I cut the stave, shaped the limbs, steam bent and heat- treated the long tips, again using the Golden Ratio: length of the limbs is 15.4″, length of the tips is 9.4″ The tips are recurved at about 30°

 

Here we are

Length:55", 50lbs/ 26", osage- orange, handle of ash, walnut, dovetailed wedges of curled maple
Length:55″, 50lbs/ 26″, osage- orange, handle of ash, walnut, dovetailed wedges of curled maple

 

Comparing "The Queen" and its brother. Pyramid shape of the queen's limbs and the much more parallel limbs of its brother ending up in different tillering shapes, as shown in the following pic.
Comparing “The Queen” and its brother. Pyramid shape of the queen’s limbs and the much more parallel limbs of its brother ending up in different tillering shapes, as shown in the following pic.
"The Queen" bending much more in the outer limbs, while its brothers limbs bending much more circular.
“The Queen” bending much more in the outer limbs, while its brothers limbs bending much more circular.
"The Brother" drawn at 16". Cause of the length and the shape of the limbs the draw is very smooth.
“The Brother” drawn at 16″. Cause of the length and the shape of the limbs the draw is very smooth.

Details

The handle
The handle: ash, walnut, curled maple
Arrow-rest of bone
Arrow-rest of bone
Tip, backview, string made of dyed linen
Tip, backview, string made of dyed linen, nocks
Backview, I left a little bit of the sapwood for to give the back a flaming look: this bow is burning.
Backview, I left a little bit of the sapwood for to give the back a flaming look: this bow is burning.

 

Sorry, I didn’ t have the time to do the chronos seriously, cause the bow was sold as soon as tillering was finished.

A guy who dropped into my workshop, saw the bow drawn in the tiller- board and wanted to buy it at once.

Chronos with a 290grs. arrow, 5/16″ and 26″ in length  tell a 187f/s speed.

I’ m such crazy about this bow, I should resist every other design.

I’ ll do the same bow very soon and post a making of.

 

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Flightzzzzz!

Very impressive post about the flight- championships at the Bonneville Salt Flats by Kap Koppedrayer published in the Primitive Archer Magazine: go

A mustread.

The Vorderheubronn Flightarrow- Massacre

Last Saturday was the day, to chrono some flightbows and flightarrows I did all over 2013.

 The setup is like follows:

Chrono setup: the chronograph is placed on a rack, all  the lights(LED) in my workshop are turned on, plus the indoor shooting lights of the chrony.
Chrono setup: the chronograph is placed on a rack, all the lights(LED) in my workshop are turned on, plus the indoor shooting lights of the chrony. There is a backstop in the background.

I found as much light as possible gives exact and serious results when doing chronos inside.

Indoor shooting lights for the chrony, installed just above the photo- sensors.
Indoor shooting lights for the chrony, installed just above the photo- sensors.
Inside the chrony with the 9V alkaline battery attached.
Inside the chrony with the 9V alkaline battery attached.
The display told me the chrony is ready.
The display told me the chrony is ready.
Best speed of the 42lbs elm sinew backed bow, shot with a 260grs. arrow made of larch.
Best speed of the 42lbs elm sinew backed bow, shot with a 260grs. arrow made of larch.
Sinew backed elm bow with inuit- style tips, bow is 44" in length, 42lbs at 23".
Sinew backed elm bow with inuit- style tips, bow is 44″ in length, 42lbs at 23″.
elmuit backed 5 72013
Sinew backed elm bow drawn at 9″
The short wild rose sinew- backed bow is 43" in length, 40lbs at 23".
The short wild rose sinew- backed bow is 43″ in length, 40lbs at 23″.
3 new flights sideview 3 2013
It shots an 180grs. hollow cedar hex- shaft arrow at 204,6f/s.

The queen of this session:

Osage bow, inuit styled tips, 46lbs at 23"
Osage bow, inuit styled tips, 46lbs at 23″
iu#nuit side 12 2013
Sideview of the queen
The queen- braced. The arrow is made of thin baked strips of fine grown larch, with the tip and the nock enforced with bird#s eye maple.
The queen- braced. The arrow is made of thin baked strips of fine grown larch, with the tip and the nock enforced with bird’ s eye maple.
That' s it! Best speed of this session.
That’ s it!
Best speed of this session.

Success so far. But I was longing for more: 300f/s!!!!

I ignored my falling concentration and accuracy and ended up with 4 broken flightarrows, the 279,0f/s arrow is lost somewhere in the disorder of my workshop. I even hitted the wire rod of the chrony and failed the backstop, my hands and fingers began to suffer. Remember zen: don’ t overdo it, underdo it.

 The fletchings remained
These arrows are all composites. I guess I should choose the wood for the arrows much more serious and take much more care on the glueing.
The fletchings have survived for the next massacre.
The fletchings have survived for the next massacre.